The Roosevelt Institute urges the Republican Party and the Democratic Party to incorporate key policies that address economic inequality into the 2016 Republican Platform and the 2016 Democratic Platform. The policies are discussed in detail in three Roosevelt Institute papers on economic growth and shared prosperity listed directly below. In our letters to the Republican

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Untamed: How to Check Corporate, Financial, and Monopoly Power outlines a policy agenda designed to rewrite the rules that shape the corporate and financial sectors and improve implementation and enforcement of existing regulations. This report, edited by Nell Abernathy, Mike Konczal, and Kathryn Milani, builds on recent analysis of economic inequality and on our 2015

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Over the last 40 years, corporate influence and trickle-down ideology have pervaded the tax code, resulting in large tax breaks for corporations and the wealthy. These low rates have failed to deliver the widespread growth that was promised, and the results for the typical American have been disastrous: Wealth at the top skyrocketed with no

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The Federal Reserve as we know it today is the product of more than a century of evolving economic theory and political and social compromise. The monetary, regulatory, and supervisory policy choices of the Fed shape macroeconomic and financial conditions in the U.S. and abroad and have long-term impacts on economic inequality. By reforming Federal

Table of Contents 1. What are “the rules”? 2. Will fighting inequality hurt growth? 3. Isn’t government part of the problem? Won’t more government intervention stifle business growth and the free market? 4. Why tax the rich more? Why should we punish people for having success? 5. What does inequality matter if everyone has the

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As presented at a congressional briefing hosted by the House Full Employment Caucus on December 1, 2015. Congressman Conyers and members of the Full Employment Caucus, thank you for the privilege of speaking to you today on the issue of the Federal Reserve accountability to the public—a topic of perennial importance that has become even more

Five years after the official end of the recession, economic activity in the U.S. remains below potential. One important reason is the slow growth in business investment, which remains weak, especially compared to previous recoveries. To an increasing number of observers, the weakness in investment appears related to the rise in what observers are calling

The goal of this paper is to address the most common objections to the idea that short-termism—the focus on short time horizons by both corporate managers and financial markets—is a serious problem for the U.S. economy. These objections fall into three broad categories: short-termism is not real (because of an apparent increase in business investment),

In an op-ed for CNBC, Roosevelt Institute President and CEO Felicia Wong said the Republican presidential candidates missed a big opportunity to connect with middle- and working-class voters at their third debate in Denver: The not-so-secret truth is that Republican voters want something different than what the candidates are proposing; they want deep structural changes

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Rewrite the Rules

Inequality is a choice. Since the 1980s, trickle-down economics has shrunk the middle class and increased the concentration of wealth at the top. But it doesn’t have to be this way: We can rewrite the rules that structure our economy and society to promote both stronger growth and shared prosperity. More and more Americans are

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