Ambitious tax reform is top of many minds this primary season. A wealth tax has emerged as one of the defining issues of the campaign, and many of the bold public programs envisioned by progressives rely on new or higher taxes on the wealthy and corporations. One tax idea that is gaining more attention is

Reclaiming public power can combat a neoliberal crisis. The Roosevelt Rundown is an email series featuring the Roosevelt Institute’s top stories of the week. How Neoliberalism Drives the Climate Crisis “Our best chance at tackling the climate crisis may well be to transcend neoliberalism,” Roosevelt Fellow Mark Paul and Colorado State University’s Anders Fremstad write

In “Don’t Fear the Deficit,” Roosevelt Fellow JW Mason and Senior Associate and Research Assistant Kristina Karlsson argue that every candidate’s plan to combat the climate crisis—as of October 2019—is affordable and can be paid for without imposing broad-based taxes on working and middle-class Americans. In fact, due to persistently low interest rates, all of

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If there can be listicles about the best burrito in every state, why not about the 2020 election?  “Last week, Ellen DeGeneres was criticized after she and former President George W. Bush were seen laughing together at a football game. Ellen defended their friendship, saying, ‘We’re all different, and I think that we’ve forgotten that

Last week, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told struggling Wisconsin dairy farmers, “In America, the big get bigger and the small go out.” In response, Jerry Volenec, a fifth-generation dairy farmer, told the Associated Press, “What I heard today from the Secretary of Agriculture is that there’s no place for me.” At the heart of Perdue’s

Tomorrow, the 10 remaining presidential candidates in the Democratic primary will take to one stage for the third primary debate. Missing from the debate stage will be Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), whose exit from the primary field leaves a critical void—and preceded that of many men who would have been missed far less. Many of

Many Americans feel the pinch (or crushing burden) of high housing costs. This issue is a top priority for most Americans—91 percent say “stable affordable housing is very or one of the most important things that affect people’s security and well-being.” Housing isn’t a commodity: It’s a necessity. Every person needs a safe and quality

The Democratic presidential candidates have elevated a host of big ideas this primary cycle and, in doing so, have challenged decades of conventional wisdom in US policymaking. As press and pundits warn of an imminent recession, it is time for them to take on flawed assumptions that have guided the mismanagement of our macroeconomy for

The past two Democratic presidential primary debates focused on a number of problems that are important to voters, including gun violence, climate change, health care, and immigration. It was a good opportunity to hear what the candidates want America’s future to look like. At the next debate, however, the moderators should press the candidates on

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In advance of tonight’s debate, a few prominent commentators and political figures—most recently former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel—have taken the current presidential field to task. These critics argue that candidates are taking policy positions that are too far outside the mainstream for any general election standard bearer. But the critics are simply wrong. Many different