Todd N. Tucker is a political scientist and fellow at the Roosevelt Forward. His research focuses on political economy, democracy, and judicial politics. A recognized expert on trade and global governance, Dr. Tucker has testified before legislatures and expert committees around the world. His writing has been featured in PoliticoTime MagazineDemocracy Journal, the Financial Times, and The Washington Post

In the wake of the election, any number of long-shot strategies has been floated for avoiding the likely outcome of the Electoral College designating Donald Trump as the next U.S. president. From costly recounting of ballots in Midwestern states to “faithless electors” that vote against their state’s winner when the college convenes on December 19, these

Last week saw the spectacle of a president-elect effectively using his bully pulpit to keep a single company from offshoring jobs. Simultaneously, another U.S. company was told by a Geneva trading group that job preservation efforts there were illegal under international law. Why was the first case (Donald Trump’s promising of tax breaks to keep Carrier jobs

From climate change to immigration reform, many progressive priorities are dead on arrival with the coming of President-elect Donald J. Trump. However, there’s at least one Trump priority that overlaps in part with progressive concerns: trade policy. As Michael Moore argued in July, Trump’s successful cooptation of labor unions’ talking points on trade catapulted him

How easy would it be for a President Trump to reverse trade liberalization? Pretty easy, as a new Peterson Institute report argues, and as I argued to Justin Wolfers in today’s New York Times. As the study show, tariff commitments can be reversed for national security purposes. Trade deals decades old could be exited by

Will TPP Stop China’s Rise?

A major thrust of President Obama’s pitch for the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, or TPP, is geopolitical. As the president himself put it last year, The world has changed. The rules are changing with it. The United States, not countries like China, should write them. Let’s seize this opportunity, pass the Trans-Pacific Partnership and make sure

Donald Trump recently made headlines for threatening to pull out of the World Trade Organization, or WTO. The proposal by the Republican presidential candidate would be a major break with the past. The 163-country pact has structured trading relations for over two decades, and a predecessor agreement goes back to roots in the 1940s. What

A U.S. junk bond company’s attempt to collect $800 million from Peruvian taxpayers over an environmental clean-up dispute was dealt a blow earlier this week. In an award released to the public on Tuesday, a trio of arbitrators ruled that the company had failed to correctly file their litigation materials. As a result, the tribunal

Sometimes corporations don’t get what they want. That was the case earlier this month when a World Bank arbitration tribunal ruled against tobacco giant Philip Morris in its suit against Uruguay. In a split decision, a majority of two arbitrators sided with the Latin American sovereign’s right to regulate, while a dissenting arbitrator sided partly